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Welcome to IRIS!

We want to hear about your identity theft.  When you report a crime at IRIS, your report will automatically get delivered to an investigating officer, and you will receive recover instructions, an Identity Theft Incident Report, and an Affidavit.

To use IRIS:

  • Agree to assisting law enforcement with your case.
  • Select the fraud type(s) that best describe your incident from the list below.
  • Click the down arrow to the right of each fraud type to review its step-by-step fraud recover instructions.
  • Click the Report Fraud(s) button to begin.
  • Create an account to file your report.
  • Answer a few questions about yourself and your incident.
  • Describe what happened in your own words.
  • Submit your report to law enforcement.
  • Print your ID Theft Affidavit and Incident Report for your records.

What We Do With Your Incident Report

Notice: Pursuant to Section 76-8-504.5 Utah Code annotated, 1953 as amended, you are notified that statements you are about to make may be presented to a magistrate or judge in lieu of your sworn testimony as a preliminary examination.  Any false statements you make and that you do not believe to be true may be subject to criminal punishment as a Class A Misdemeanor.

I am willing to press charges and/or work with law enforcement if charges are brought against the person(s) who committed the fraud.
IMPORTANT! You cannot submit any fraud complaints unless you agree to the statement above.

Checking or Savings Account

Click here to add Unauthorized withdrawal from your checking or savings account to the list of the frauds you want to report.
Unauthorized withdrawal from your checking or savings account
Open

Download PDFUnauthorized withdrawal from your checking or savings account

Steps to Take Immediately – Follow each step below to help recover from the damage caused by identity theft.

Step 1: Organize Your Case

In order to help law enforcement investigate your case, and to help recover from the damage caused by an identity theft, you should:

  • Keep a detailed list of all phone calls you receive or make related to your identity theft incident including name of the person you spoke with, that person’s title, phone number, organization name, and what was said during the conversation.
  • Make sure you keep a copy of all financial statements, police reports, affidavits, credit reports, collection letters, and all other documents related to your incident.
  • Keep all loose documents in a notebook or accordion folder.
  • Send all correspondence using certified mail with return receipt requested.
  • Keep track of your time and any expenses you incur in the event you are given the opportunity to be reimbursed for your costs through court ordered restitution.

Use ID Theft Central’s Contact Tracking Sheet to keep track of the people you speak with regarding your identity theft incident.

Step 2: Contact your financial institution

Review your bank statements and contact your financial institution and notify them of all unauthorized withdrawals/charges immediately. Close all compromised accounts and open new ones.  Make sure to ask your financial institution to password protect all new accounts. Your financial institution will most likely require you to provide proof of your identity and will want you to complete their affidavit.

Step 3: Initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert

To help protect your personal identifying information from being used to obtain new credit by a thief, initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert. A 90 Day Fraud Alert notifies potential credit grantors to verify your identification before extending new credit in your name.

  • You only need to contact one of the three credit reporting companies to set up a Fraud Alert for all three.
  • You will receive a free copy of your credit report from all three credit reporting companies.
  • You will receive a notice of your rights as an identity theft victim.
  • A 90 Day Fraud Alert stays on your file for at least 90 days and can be renewed.
  • A Fraud Alert may slow down your approval process for new credit.

To place a Fraud Alert, you may be required to provide appropriate proof of your identity, which may include copies of your Social Security card, driver’s license, and/or utility bills. You may cancel the fraud alerts at any time.

Experian
P.O. Box 9532
Allen, TX 75013
1-888-397-3742
www.experian.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Equifax
P.O. Box 740250
Atlanta, GA 30374-0241
1-800-525-6285
www.equifax.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Transunion
P.O. Box 6790
Fullerton, CA 92834-6790
1-800-680-7289
www.transunion.com

Click to file a 90-Day Fraud Alert

Step 4: File an identity theft report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department

Once you have confirmed unauthorized withdrawals or accounts opened in your name, file a report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department.

  • Report the crime at ID Theft Central.
  • Contact your local police department and report the crime by calling their non-emergency number and explain to them what happened.
  • Make sure your police department issues you a police report with a case number.
  • You can use their police report to obtain a Consumer Credit Freeze from the credit reporting companies at no cost.  You can also use the report to help clear the damage caused by the theft.

Step 5:  Monitor your bank accounts and credit reports regularly

It is important that you check your bank accounts and credit reports regularly to identify illegal activity. Early detection is key to minimizing the damage that mistakes and fraudulent activity can have on your credit.

The federal FACTA law enables you to receive one free credit report per year from each of the three credit reporting agencies. These are in addition to the free reports you can order after you place a Fraud Alert on your credit file. Order your free credit reports online at www.annualcreditreport.com.

We recommend that you stagger the receipt of your credit reports, ordering one approximately every four months. Order your report from a different agency each time. That way you can review your credit report three times each year. If you see possible fraudulent activity on your credit report, file all of the appropriate reports on this web site.

 

You Might Also Like

Consumer Credit Freeze

Contact Tracking Sheet

How to use a Police Report to help recover from identity theft

How to use an identity theft Affidavit to help recover from identity theft

Benefits

Click here to add Medicaid/Medicare, insurance, or State benefits to the list of the frauds you want to report.
Medicaid/Medicare, insurance, or State benefits
Open

Download PDFMedicaid/Medicare, insurance, or State benefits

Steps to Take Immediately – Follow each step below to help recover from the damage caused by identity theft.

If you have been notified by a medical service provider, insurance company, a state or federal government agency, or if you have received calls from a collection agency about services or benefits that you are not aware of, then a thief may be using your identity to obtain benefits.  If you identify benefits identity theft, you should order copies of your records to check for mistakes.  You have the right to see your records and have them corrected.

Step 1: Organize Your Case

In order to help law enforcement investigate your case, and to help recover from the damage caused by an identity theft, you should:

  • Keep a detailed list of all phone calls you receive or make related to your identity theft incident including name of the person you spoke with, that person’s title, phone number, organization name, and what was said during the conversation.
  • Make sure you keep a copy of all medical, government documents, financial statements, police reports, affidavits, credit reports, collection letters, and all other documents related to your incident.
  • Keep all loose documents in a notebook or accordion folder.
  • Send all correspondence using certified mail with return receipt requested.
  • Keep track of your time and any expenses you incur in the event you are given the opportunity to be reimbursed for your costs through court ordered restitution.

Use ID Theft Central’s Contact Tracking Sheet to keep track of the people you speak with regarding your identity theft incident.

Step 2: Contact the benefits provider

Contact the benefits provider and inform them of the situation. Request, in writing, copies of all documentation associated with the fraud, including the fraudulent application. Submit any documentation received to the investigating law enforcement agency. Contact each doctor, clinic, hospital, pharmacy, laboratory, health plan, and location where a thief may have used your information. If a medical provider refuses to provide you with copies of your records because it thinks that would violate the identity thief’s privacy rights, you have a right to appeal their decision.  Contact the person the provider lists in its Notice of Privacy Practices, the patient representative, or the ombudsman.  Explain your situation and ask for your records.  If after 30 days, your provider has not provided you with your written request for your records, you may file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office for Civil Rights.

Step 3: Get an Accounting of Disclosure

Request from each of your health plans and medical providers a copy of the “Accounting of Disclosure” for your medical records.  The accounting is a record of who got copies from your provider.  The law allows you to order one free copy of the accounting from each of your medical providers every 12 months.  The accounting shows a listing of all disclosures of an individual’s protected health information (PHI) made by the medical provider or its business associates for up to six years preceding the request.  Note that the accounting may exclude disclosures made by the medical provider to carry out treatment, payment and health care operations, which constitute the overwhelming majority of communications.  Covered entities have 60 days to meet your request.  An additional 30-day extension beyond that is allowed if the requester is provided with a written explanation for the delay.

Individuals are entitled to a single accounting every 12 months without charge.  Additional requests within a 12-month period may be subject to a “reasonable, cost-based fee.”  As with other HIPAA rights, institutions must designate a privacy office/officer to handle disclosure accounting requests, and must document the processing of any requests that are received.

Step 4: Ask for corrections

Write to your health plan and medical providers and explain which information is not accurate. Send copies of the documents that support your position.  You can include a copy of your medical records and circle the disputed items.  Ask the provider to correct or delete each error.  Be sure to keep the original documents. All correspondence should be sent by certified mail, and ask for “return receipt,” so you have records of what the plan or provider received. Mistaken information in your medical records must be changed by the health plan or medical provider that made the mistake.  You should ask the medical or benefit provider that made the mistake to contacts labs, other health care providers, and anyone else that might have gotten the wrong information.  If your health care or benefits provider refuses to make the changes you request, ask it to include a statement of your dispute in your record.

Step 5: File an identity theft report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department

Once you have confirmed unauthorized use of your information to obtain benefits in your name, file a report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department.

  • Report the crime at ID Theft Central.
  • Contact your local police department and report the crime by calling their non-emergency number and explain to them what happened.
  • Make sure your police department issues you a police report with a case number.
  • You can use their police report to obtain a Consumer Credit Freeze from the credit reporting companies at no cost.  You can also use the report to help clear the damage caused by the theft.

Step 6: Send a copy of your police report to your health insurer’s or benefits provider’s fraud department.

Step 7: Initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert

To help protect your personal identifying information from being used to obtain new credit by a thief, initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert. A 90 Day Fraud Alert notifies potential credit grantors to verify your identification before extending new credit in your name.

  • You only need to contact one of the three credit reporting companies to set up a Fraud Alert for all three.
  • You will receive a free copy of your credit report from all three credit reporting companies.
  • You will receive a notice of your rights as an identity theft victim.
  • A 90 Day Fraud Alert stays on your file for at least 90 days and can be renewed.
  • A Fraud Alert may slow down your approval process for new credit.

To place a Fraud Alert, you may be required to provide appropriate proof of your identity, which may include copies of your Social Security card, driver’s license, and/or utility bills. You may cancel the fraud alerts at any time.

Experian
P.O. Box 9532
Allen, TX 75013
1-888-397-3742
www.experian.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Equifax
P.O. Box 740250
Atlanta, GA 30374-0241
1-800-525-6285
www.equifax.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Transunion
P.O. Box 6790
Fullerton, CA 92834-6790
1-800-680-7289
www.transunion.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

 

You Might Also Like

Consumer Credit Freeze

Contact Tracking Sheet

How to use a Police Report to help recover from identity theft

How to use an identity theft Affidavit to help recover from identity theft

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Credit

Click here to add Unauthorized use of your credit card to the list of the frauds you want to report.
Unauthorized use of your credit card
Open

Download PDFUnauthorized use of your credit card 

Steps to Take Immediately – Follow each step below to help recover from the damage caused by identity theft.

Step 1: Organize Your Case

In order to help law enforcement investigate your case, and to help recover from the damage caused by an identity theft, you should:

  • Keep a detailed list of all phone calls you receive or make related to your identity theft incident including name of the person you spoke with, that person’s title, phone number, organization name, and what was said during the conversation.
  • Make sure you keep a copy of all financial statements, police reports, affidavits, credit reports, collection letters, and all other documents related to your incident.
  • Keep all loose documents in a notebook or accordion folder.
  • Send all correspondence using certified mail with return receipt requested.
  • Keep track of your time and any expenses you incur in the event you are given the opportunity to be reimbursed for your costs through court ordered restitution.

Use ID Theft Central’s Contact Tracking Sheet to keep track of the people you speak with regarding your identity theft incident.

Step 2: Contact your financial institution

  • Review your credit card statement line-by-line and contact your financial institution and notify them of all unauthorized withdrawals/charges immediately.
  • Close all compromised accounts and open new ones.
  • Make sure to ask your financial institution to password protect all new accounts. Your financial institution will most likely require you to provide proof of your identity and will want you to complete their affidavit.
  • Ask your credit card company for copies of documents the thief used to open new accounts or charge purchases in your name.

Step 3: Initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert

To help protect your personal identifying information from being used to obtain new credit by a thief, initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert. A 90 Day Fraud Alert notifies potential credit grantors to verify your identification before extending new credit in your name.

  • You only need to contact one of the three credit reporting companies to set up a Fraud Alert for all three.
  • You will receive a free copy of your credit report from all three credit reporting companies.
  • You will receive a notice of your rights as an identity theft victim.
  • A 90 Day Fraud Alert stays on your file for at least 90 days and can be renewed.
  • A Fraud Alert may slow down your approval process for new credit.

To place a Fraud Alert, you may be required to provide appropriate proof of your identity, which may include copies of your Social Security card, driver’s license, and/or utility bills. You may cancel the fraud alerts at any time.

Experian
P.O. Box 9532
Allen, TX 75013
1-888-397-3742
www.experian.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Equifax
P.O. Box 740250
Atlanta, GA 30374-0241
1-800-525-6285
www.equifax.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

TransUnion
P.O. Box 6790
Fullerton, CA 92834-6790
1-800-680-7289
www.transunion.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Step 4: File an identity theft report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department

Once you have confirmed unauthorized withdrawals, charges, or accounts opened in your name, file a report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department.

  • Report the crime at ID Theft Central.
  • Contact your local police department and report the crime by calling their non-emergency number and explain to them what happened.
  • Make sure your police department issues you a police report with a case number.
  • You can use their police report to obtain a Consumer Credit Freeze from the credit reporting companies at no cost.  You can also use the report to help clear the damage caused by the theft.

Step 5:  Monitor your bank accounts and credit reports regularly

It is important that you check your bank accounts and credit reports regularly to identify illegal activity. Early detection is key to minimizing the damage that mistakes and fraudulent activity can have on your credit.

The federal FACTA law enables you to receive one free credit report per year from each of the three credit reporting agencies. These are in addition to the free reports you can order after you place a Fraud Alert on your credit file. Order your free credit reports online at www.annualcreditreport.com.

We recommend that you stagger the receipt of your credit reports, ordering one approximately every four months. Order your report from a different agency each time. That way you can review your credit report three times each year. If you see possible fraudulent activity on your credit report, file all of the appropriate reports on this web site.

 

You Might Also Like

Consumer Credit Freeze

Contact Tracking Sheet

How to use a Police Report to help recover from identity theft

How to use an identity theft Affidavit to help recover from identity theft

Click here to add Unauthorized accounts on credit report to the list of the frauds you want to report.
Unauthorized accounts on credit report
Open

Download PDFUnauthorized accounts on credit report

Steps to Take Immediately – Follow each step below to help recover from the damage caused by identity theft.

Step 1: Organize Your Case

In order to help law enforcement investigate your case, and to help recover from the damage caused by an identity theft, you should:

  • Keep a detailed list of all phone calls you receive or make related to your identity theft incident including name of the person you spoke with, that person’s title, phone number, organization name, and what was said during the conversation.
  • Make sure you keep a copy of all financial statements, police reports, affidavits, credit reports, collection letters, and all other documents related to your incident.
  • Keep all loose documents in a notebook or accordion folder.
  • Send all correspondence using certified mail with return receipt requested.
  • Keep track of your time and any expenses you incur in the event you are given the opportunity to be reimbursed for your costs through court ordered restitution.

Use ID Theft Central’s Contact Tracking Sheet to keep track of the people you speak with regarding your identity theft incident.

Step 2: Contact the three credit reporting agencies

If you believe a thief is using your identity to commit crimes, then you should contact the three major credit reporting agencies (Equifax, Experian, TransUnion) and obtain copies of your credit report.  After you get your credit reports, read them carefully to see if fraudulent transactions or accounts are listed.  If you identify errors in your credit reports, like accounts you didn’t open or debts you didn’t incur, you will need to dispute the errors with the credit reporting agencies and with the fraud department of each business that reported an error.

If errors are the result of identity theft, and you have an identity theft report from a law enforcement agency:

  • Ask the credit reporting agencies and business to block the disputed information from appearing on your credit reports.  The credit reporting agencies must block transactions and accounts if you are a victim of identity theft.
  • Request copies of documents from the businesses you are asking to correct errors that the thief used to open new accounts or to make charges in your name.
  • Include copies of your police report or the proof the business requires, and proof of your identity.

The business must send you copies of the records you requested within 30 days of getting your request. 

Step 3: Initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert

To help protect your personal identifying information from being used to obtain new credit by a thief, initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert. A 90 Day Fraud Alert notifies potential credit grantors to verify your identification before extending new credit in your name.

  • You only need to contact one of the three credit reporting companies to set up a Fraud Alert for all three.
  • You will receive a free copy of your credit report from all three credit reporting companies.
  • You will receive a notice of your rights as an identity theft victim.
  • A 90 Day Fraud Alert stays on your file for at least 90 days and can be renewed.
  • A Fraud Alert may slow down your approval process for new credit.

To place a Fraud Alert, you may be required to provide appropriate proof of your identity, which may include copies of your Social Security card, driver’s license, and/or utility bills. You may cancel the fraud alerts at any time.

Experian
P.O. Box 9532
Allen, TX 75013
1-888-397-3742
www.experian.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Equifax
P.O. Box 740250
Atlanta, GA 30374-0241
1-800-525-6285
www.equifax.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Transunion
P.O. Box 6790
Fullerton, CA 92834-6790
1-800-680-7289
www.transunion.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Step 4: File an identity theft report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department

Once you have confirmed unauthorized charges or accounts opened in your name, file a report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department.

  • Report the crime at ID Theft Central.
  • Contact your local police department and report the crime by calling their non-emergency number and explain to them what happened.
  • Make sure your police department issues you a police report with a case number.
  • You can use their police report to obtain a Consumer Credit Freeze from the credit reporting companies at no cost.  You can also use the report to help clear the damage caused by the theft.

Step 5:  Monitor your bank accounts and credit reports regularly

It is important that you check your bank accounts and credit reports regularly to identify illegal activity. Early detection is key to minimizing the damage that mistakes and fraudulent activity can have on your credit.

The federal FACTA law enables you to receive one free credit report per year from each of the three credit reporting agencies. These are in addition to the free reports you can order after you place a Fraud Alert on your credit file. Order your free credit reports online at www.annualcreditreport.com.

We recommend that you stagger the receipt of your credit reports, ordering one approximately every four months. Order your report from a different agency each time. That way you can review your credit report three times each year. If you see possible fraudulent activity on your credit report, file all of the appropriate reports on this web site.

 

You Might Also Like

Consumer Credit Freeze

Contact Tracking Sheet

How to use a Police Report to help recover from identity theft

How to use an identity theft Affidavit to help recover from identity theft

 

Click here to add Unauthorized loan to the list of the frauds you want to report.
Unauthorized loan
Open

Download PDFUnauthorized loan

 Steps to Take Immediately – Follow each step below to help recover from the damage caused by identity theft.

Step 1: Organize Your Case

In order to help law enforcement investigate your case, and to help recover from the damage caused by an identity theft, you should:

  • Keep a detailed list of all phone calls you receive or make related to your identity theft incident including name of the person you spoke with, that person’s title, phone number, organization name, and what was said during the conversation.
  • Make sure you keep a copy of all financial statements, police reports, affidavits, credit reports, collection letters, and all other documents related to your incident.
  • Keep all loose documents in a notebook or accordion folder.
  • Send all correspondence using certified mail with return receipt requested.
  • Keep track of your time and any expenses you incur in the event you are given the opportunity to be reimbursed for your costs through court ordered restitution.

Use ID Theft Central’s Contact Tracking Sheet to keep track of the people you speak with regarding your identity theft incident.

Step 2: Contact the Creditor

Contact the creditor’s fraud department and tell them you are a victim of identity theft. Request in writing, a copy of the fraudulent application and any other supporting documentation. Send all correspondence by certified mail, return receipt requested. According to the FACTA consumers are entitled to a copy of the application and business transaction records no later than 30 days from receipt of request. You will need to provide proof of positive identification, a copy of the Identity Theft Report and an affidavit that is acceptable to the business entity. There should be no charge for this information. Submit copies of any documentation received to the investigating law enforcement agency.

Step 3: Initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert

To help protect your personal identifying information from being used to obtain new credit by a thief, initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert. A 90 Day Fraud Alert notifies potential credit grantors to verify your identification before extending new credit in your name.

  • You only need to contact one of the three credit reporting companies to set up a Fraud Alert for all three.
  • You will receive a free copy of your credit report from all three credit reporting companies.
  • You will receive a notice of your rights as an identity theft victim.
  • A 90 Day Fraud Alert stays on your file for at least 90 days and can be renewed.
  • A Fraud Alert may slow down your approval process for new credit.

To place a Fraud Alert, you may be required to provide appropriate proof of your identity, which may include copies of your Social Security card, driver’s license, and/or utility bills. You may cancel the fraud alerts at any time.

Experian
P.O. Box 9532
Allen, TX 75013
1-888-397-3742
www.experian.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Equifax
P.O. Box 740250
Atlanta, GA 30374-0241
1-800-525-6285
www.equifax.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Transunion
P.O. Box 6790
Fullerton, CA 92834-6790
1-800-680-7289
www.transunion.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Step 4: File an identity theft report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department

Once you have confirmed unauthorized loans, withdrawals, or accounts opened in your name, file a report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department.

  • Report the crime at ID Theft Central.
  • Contact your local police department and report the crime by calling their non-emergency number and explain to them what happened.
  • Make sure your police department issues you a police report with a case number.
  • You can use their police report to obtain a Consumer Credit Freeze from the credit reporting companies at no cost.  You can also use the report to help clear the damage caused by the theft.

Step 5:  Monitor your bank accounts and credit reports regularly

It is important that you check your bank accounts and credit reports regularly to identify illegal activity. Early detection is key to minimizing the damage that mistakes and fraudulent activity can have on your credit.

The federal FACTA law enables you to receive one free credit report per year from each of the three credit reporting agencies. These are in addition to the free reports you can order after you place a Fraud Alert on your credit file. Order your free credit reports online at www.annualcreditreport.com.

We recommend that you stagger the receipt of your credit reports, ordering one approximately every four months. Order your report from a different agency each time. That way you can review your credit report three times each year. If you see possible fraudulent activity on your credit report, file all of the appropriate reports on this web site.

 

You Might Also Like

Consumer Credit Freeze

Contact Tracking Sheet

How to use a Police Report to help recover from identity theft

How to use an identity theft Affidavit to help recover from identity theft

 

 

 

 

Click here to add Collection agency to the list of the frauds you want to report.
Collection agency
Open

Download PDFCollection agency 

 Steps to Take Immediately – Follow each step below to help recover from the damage caused by identity theft.

Step 1: Organize Your Case

In order to help law enforcement investigate your case, and to help recover from the damage caused by an identity theft, you should:

  • Keep a detailed list of all phone calls you receive or make related to your identity theft incident including name of the person you spoke with, that person’s title, phone number, organization name, and what was said during the conversation.
  • Make sure you keep a copy of all financial statements, police reports, affidavits, credit reports, collection letters, and all other documents related to your incident.
  • Keep all loose documents in a notebook or accordion folder.
  • Send all correspondence using certified mail with return receipt requested.
  • Keep track of your time and any expenses you incur in the event you are given the opportunity to be reimbursed for your costs through court ordered restitution.

Use ID Theft Central’s Contact Tracking Sheet to keep track of the people you speak with regarding your identity theft incident.

Step 2: Contact the collection agency

Call the collection agency and advise them that you are a victim of identity theft and that you are disputing the debt. Ask the collection agency what they or the original creditor require to support your claim of identity theft.

A fraud affidavit is typically required. Ask the collection agency if they will accept a generic affidavit or if they require their own.

According to the Consumer Credit Protection Act, within five days after you are first contacted, the collection agency must send you a written notice telling you:

  • The amount of the debt.
  • The name of the creditor to whom the debt is owed.
  • A statement that unless the consumer, within thirty days after receipt of the notice, disputes the validity of the debt, or any portion thereof, the debt will be assumed to be valid by the debt collector.
  • A statement that if the consumer notifies the debt collector in writing within the thirty-day period that the debt, or any portion thereof, is disputed, the debt collector will obtain verification of the debt or a copy of a judgment against the consumer and a copy of such verification or judgment will be mailed to the consumer by the debt collector
  • A statement that, upon the consumer’s written request within the thirty-day period, the debt collector will provide the consumer with the name and address of the original creditor, if different from the current creditor.

Debt Collection FAQs

Fair Debt Collection Practices Act

Step 3: Confirmation of Conversation

Follow-up as soon as possible with a Confirmation of Conversation letter, but do not exceed 30 days, or you may loose valuable consumer rights. (Example: Claim of Fraudulent Debt Collection). Include with your letter a copy of the Identity Theft Report and proof of your identity. Send all correspondence by certified mail, return receipt requested.

If you notify the collection agency that you are disputing the debt, they cannot report the debt to a credit-reporting agency without also providing notice of your dispute (See Consumer Credit Protection Act).

Step 4: Letter of Clearance Request

Send a second follow-up letter after you have received verification of the debt. Include with your letter, copies (not originals) of the notarized fraud affidavit and all requested documentation. Request a Letter of Clearance stating that you do not owe the debt. Again, send all correspondence by certified mail, return receipt requested.

If you do not receive a Letter of Clearance within 30 days send a follow-up letter (Example:Sample follow-up letter)to the collection agency via certified mail, return receipt requested.

Step 5: Initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert

To help protect your personal identifying information from being used to obtain new credit by a thief, initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert. A 90 Day Fraud Alert notifies potential credit grantors to verify your identification before extending new credit in your name.

  • You only need to contact one of the three credit reporting companies to set up a Fraud Alert for all three.
  • You will receive a free copy of your credit report from all three credit reporting companies.
  • You will receive a notice of your rights as an identity theft victim.
  • A 90 Day Fraud Alert stays on your file for at least 90 days and can be renewed.
  • A Fraud Alert may slow down your approval process for new credit.

To place a Fraud Alert, you may be required to provide appropriate proof of your identity, which may include copies of your Social Security card, driver’s license, and/or utility bills. You may cancel the fraud alerts at any time.

Experian
P.O. Box 9532
Allen, TX 75013
1-888-397-3742
www.experian.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Equifax
P.O. Box 740250
Atlanta, GA 30374-0241
1-800-525-6285
www.equifax.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Transunion
P.O. Box 6790
Fullerton, CA 92834-6790
1-800-680-7289
www.transunion.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Step 6: File an identity theft report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department

Once you have confirmed unauthorized debt, withdrawals or accounts opened in your name, file a report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department.

  • Report the crime at ID Theft Central.
  • Contact your local police department and report the crime by calling their non-emergency number and explain to them what happened.
  • Make sure your police department issues you a police report with a case number.
  • You can use their police report to obtain a Consumer Credit Freeze from the credit reporting companies at no cost.  You can also use the report to help clear the damage caused by the theft.

Step 7: Monitor your bank accounts and credit reports regularly

It is important that you check your bank accounts and credit reports regularly to identify illegal activity. Early detection is key to minimizing the damage that mistakes and fraudulent activity can have on your credit.

The federal FACTA law enables you to receive one free credit report per year from each of the three credit reporting agencies. These are in addition to the free reports you can order after you place a Fraud Alert on your credit file. Order your free credit reports online at www.annualcreditreport.com.

We recommend that you stagger the receipt of your credit reports, ordering one approximately every four months. Order your report from a different agency each time. That way you can review your credit report three times each year. If you see possible fraudulent activity on your credit report, file all of the appropriate reports on this web site.

 

You Might Also Like

Consumer Credit Freeze

Contact Tracking Sheet

How to use a Police Report to help recover from identity theft

How to use an identity theft Affidavit to help recover from identity theft

 

 

 

Government Document

Click here to add Driver License or ID lost, stolen or misused to the list of the frauds you want to report.
Driver License or ID lost, stolen or misused
Open

Download PDFDriver License or ID lost, stolen or misused

 Steps to Take Immediately – Follow each step below to help recover from the damage caused by identity theft.

Step 1: Organize Your Case

In order to help law enforcement investigate your case, and to help recover from the damage caused by an identity theft, you should:

  • Keep a detailed list of all phone calls you receive or make related to your identity theft incident including name of the person you spoke with, that person’s title, phone number, organization name, and what was said during the conversation.
  • Make sure you keep a copy of all financial statements, police reports, affidavits, credit reports, collection letters, and all other documents related to your incident.
  • Keep all loose documents in a notebook or accordion folder.
  • Send all correspondence using certified mail with return receipt requested.
  • Keep track of your time and any expenses you incur in the event you are given the opportunity to be reimbursed for your costs through court ordered restitution.

Use ID Theft Central’s Contact Tracking Sheet to keep track of the people you speak with regarding your identity theft incident.

Step 2: Contact Driver’s License Division

Contact the nearest Driver License Division to obtain a replacement license. A fee will be charged and you will be required to produce:

  • A Social Security card.
  • Two documents verifying your Utah residency.

Utah Department of Public Safety
4501 South 2700 West
Box 141775
Salt Lake City, UT 84119
Phone: 801-965-4461
Toll Free: 1-800-222-0038
www.driverlicense.utah.gov

Step 3: Initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert

To help protect your personal identifying information from being used to obtain new credit by a thief, initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert. A 90 Day Fraud Alert notifies potential credit grantors to verify your identification before extending new credit in your name.

  • You only need to contact one of the three credit reporting companies to set up a Fraud Alert for all three.
  • You will receive a free copy of your credit report from all three credit reporting companies.
  • You will receive a notice of your rights as an identity theft victim.
  • A 90 Day Fraud Alert stays on your file for at least 90 days and can be renewed.
  • A Fraud Alert may slow down your approval process for new credit.

To place a Fraud Alert, you may be required to provide appropriate proof of your identity, which may include copies of your Social Security card, driver’s license, and/or utility bills. You may cancel the fraud alerts at any time.

Experian
P.O. Box 9532
Allen, TX 75013
1-888-397-3742
www.experian.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Equifax
P.O. Box 740250
Atlanta, GA 30374-0241
1-800-525-6285
www.equifax.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Transunion
P.O. Box 6790
Fullerton, CA 92834-6790
1-800-680-7289
www.transunion.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Step 4: File an identity theft report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department

Once you have confirmed that a thief has stolen and is using your Utah Driver License or ID, you should file a report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department.

  • Report the crime at ID Theft Central.
  • Contact your local police department and report the crime by calling their non-emergency number and explain to them what happened.
  • Make sure your police department issues you a police report with a case number.
  • You can use their police report to obtain a Consumer Credit Freeze from the credit reporting companies at no cost.  You can also use the report to help clear the damage caused by the theft.

Step 5:  Monitor your bank accounts and credit reports regularly

It is important that you check your bank accounts and credit reports regularly to identify illegal activity. Early detection is key to minimizing the damage that mistakes and fraudulent activity can have on your credit.

The federal FACTA law enables you to receive one free credit report per year from each of the three credit reporting agencies. These are in addition to the free reports you can order after you place a Fraud Alert on your credit file. Order your free credit reports online at www.annualcreditreport.com.

We recommend that you stagger the receipt of your credit reports, ordering one approximately every four months. Order your report from a different agency each time. That way you can review your credit report three times each year. If you see possible fraudulent activity on your credit report, file all of the appropriate reports on this web site.

 

You Might Also Like

Consumer Credit Freeze

Contact Tracking Sheet

How to use a Police Report to help recover from identity theft

How to use an identity theft Affidavit to help recover from identity theft

Click here to add Social Security Number theft to the list of the frauds you want to report.
Social Security Number theft
Open

Download PDFSocial Security Number Theft 

 Steps to Take Immediately – Follow each step below to help recover from the damage caused by identity theft.

Step 1: Report Identity Theft

If you have received a notice from the Department of Workforce Services or another government agency regarding the misuse of your child’s Social Security number, or if you know that your Social Security number is being misused, do the following:

  • Report the crime at ID Theft Central, or to your local police department.
  • Make sure you receive a police report with a case number.
  • Ask the investigating officer to request a work history report on the misused Social Security number from the Department of Workforce Services. This will help the police investigate the crime.
  • If your child is under the age of 17, be sure to enroll the child in the Child Identity Protection program at ID Theft Central
  • Contact the three credit reporting agencies to check whether you or your child have fraudulent accounts on your credit reports.
  • Contact any financial institution where a credit account was created and ask them to close the account. You may need to provide the bank your police report and an affidavit.
  • Contact the government agency that refused your child benefits and provide them a copy of your police report to prove your child is a victim of identity theft. You also may need to provide the agency with a copy of your child’s Birth Certificate and Social Security card in order to prove your child is the not the person using the information for employment.

Step 2: Organize Your Case

In order to help law enforcement investigate your case, and to help recover from the damage caused by an identity theft, you should:

  • Keep a detailed list of all phone calls you receive or make related to your identity theft incident including name of the person you spoke with, that person’s title, phone number, organization name, and what was said during the conversation.
  • Make sure you keep a copy of all financial statements, police reports, affidavits, credit reports, collection letters, and all other documents related to your incident.
  • Keep all loose documents in a notebook or accordion folder.
  • Send all correspondence using certified mail with return receipt requested.
  • Keep track of your time and any expenses you incur in the event you are given the opportunity to be reimbursed for your costs through court ordered restitution.

Use ID Theft Central’s Contact Tracking Sheet to keep track of the people you speak with regarding your identity theft incident.

Step 3: Consent of Release of your Social Security Information

Certain situations may require you to provide proof of your Social Security Number. If you are unable to establish accounts with financial institutions, creditors, insurance agencies, or to obtain medical treatment because of identity theft, you should complete form SSA-3288. Request that your information be released to the organizations that are requesting proof of your Social Security Number. Make sure you provide each organization’s name, address, and a contact person.

Step 4: Replacement Social Security Card

You can replace your Social Security card for free if it is lost or stolen. However, you are limited to three replacement cards in a year and 10 during your lifetime.

To get a replacement card:

  • Complete a Social Security Application
  • Show documents proving U.S. citizenship, and identity.

Take your completed application and documents to your local Social Security office.
www.socialsecurity.gov

Step 5: IRS Records Indicate You Received Wages From an Employer Unknown to You

If you have experienced one of the following, it may indicate that someone is using your Social Security Number without your permission for employment purposes:

  • You received a letter 4491C from the Internal Revenue Service stating that you were a victim of employment related identity theft.
  • You received a notice from the Internal Revenue Service stating that you received wages that you did not earn.
  • You received a Form W-2 or 1099 from an employer for whom you did not work.
  • You received your annual “Notice of Earnings” statement from the Social Security Administration and the income showing on the statement is more than you have earned.
  • Your Social Security benefits have been adjusted/denied because of wages that you did not earn.

What you should do:

The IRS has a toll-free number to assist identity theft victims. The IRS Identity Protection Specialized Unit will mark affected accounts so that identity theft issues may be resolved more quickly. Victims can call (800) 908-4490 and speak with a customer service rep Monday – Friday, from 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

You will need to complete IRS Form 14039 and submit it to the IRS if you are an actual or potential victim of identity theft and would like to mark your account to identify questionable activity.  Filing Form 14039 may qualify tax payers for heightened security measures. Make sure you check Box 2.

Ask for a PIN from the IRS

The IRS issues victims of tax identity theft a six-digit Identity Protection PIN for use in filing returns once cases have been resolved. Returns can’t be filed without the number, and victims receive a new number every year.

Step 6:  Monitor your bank accounts and credit reports regularly

It is important that you check your bank accounts and credit reports regularly to identify illegal activity. Early detection is key to minimizing the damage that mistakes and fraudulent activity can have on your credit.

The federal FACTA law enables you to receive one free credit report per year from each of the three credit reporting agencies. These are in addition to the free reports you can order after you place a Fraud Alert on your credit file. Order your free credit reports online at www.annualcreditreport.com.

We recommend that you stagger the receipt of your credit reports, ordering one approximately every four months. Order your report from a different agency each time. That way you can review your credit report three times each year. If you see possible fraudulent activity on your credit report, file all of the appropriate reports on this web site.

 

You Might Also Like

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Contact Tracking Sheet

What to do if your child is a victim of identity theft

How to use a Police Report to help recover from identity theft

How to use an identity theft Affidavit to help recover from identity theft

 

 

 

Utilities/Telephone

Click here to add Telephone service (land line or cellular) to the list of the frauds you want to report.
Telephone service (land line or cellular)
Open

Download PDFTelephone service (land line or cellular)

Steps to Take Immediately – Follow each step below to help recover from the damage caused by identity theft.

 Step 1: Organize Your Case

In order to help law enforcement investigate your case, and to help recover from the damage caused by an identity theft, you should:

  • Keep a detailed list of all phone calls you receive or make related to your identity theft incident including name of the person you spoke with, that person’s title, phone number, organization name, and what was said during the conversation.
  • Make sure you keep a copy of all financial statements, police reports, affidavits, credit reports, collection letters, and all other documents related to your incident.
  • Keep all loose documents in a notebook or accordion folder.
  • Send all correspondence using certified mail with return receipt requested.
  • Keep track of your time and any expenses you incur in the event you are given the opportunity to be reimbursed for your costs through court ordered restitution.

Use ID Theft Central’s Contact Tracking Sheet to keep track of the people you speak with regarding your identity theft incident.

Step 2: Contact your service provider’s Fraud Department

Contact your telephone service provider’s Fraud Department and tell them you are a victim of identity theft and to cancel the fraudulent service. Make sure to establish a password for any valid account(s), which must be used any time the account (s) is changed.

Request, in writing, a copy of the application and any other supporting documentation. All correspondence should be sent by certified mail, return receipt requested. According to The Fair And Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA) consumers are entitled to a copy of the application and business transaction records no later than 30 days from receipt of request. You will need to provide proof of positive identification, a copy of an Identity Theft Report and an affidavit that is acceptable to the business entity. There should be no charge for this information. Submit copies of any documentation received to the investigating law enforcement agency.

Step 3: Initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert

To help protect your personal identifying information from being used to set up telephone service by a thief, initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert. A 90 Day Fraud Alert notifies potential credit grantors to verify your identification before extending new credit in your name.

  • You only need to contact one of the three credit reporting companies to set up a Fraud Alert for all three.
  • You will receive a free copy of your credit report from all three credit reporting companies.
  • You will receive a notice of your rights as an identity theft victim.
  • A 90 Day Fraud Alert stays on your file for at least 90 days and can be renewed.
  • A Fraud Alert may slow down your approval process for new credit.

To place a Fraud Alert, you may be required to provide appropriate proof of your identity, which may include copies of your Social Security card, driver’s license, and/or utility bills. You may cancel the fraud alerts at any time.

Experian
P.O. Box 9532
Allen, TX 75013
1-888-397-3742
www.experian.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Equifax
P.O. Box 740250
Atlanta, GA 30374-0241
1-800-525-6285
www.equifax.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Transunion
P.O. Box 6790
Fullerton, CA 92834-6790
1-800-680-7289
www.transunion.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day fraud Alert

Step 4: File an identity theft report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department

Once you have confirmed unauthorized use of your information to set up telephone service in your name, file a report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department.

  • Report the crime at ID Theft Central.
  • Contact your local police department and report the crime by calling their non-emergency number and explain to them what happened.
  • Make sure your police department issues you a police report with a case number.
  • You can use their police report to obtain a Consumer Credit Freeze from the credit reporting companies at no cost.  You can also use the report to help clear the damage caused by the theft.

Step 5:  Monitor your bank accounts and credit reports regularly

It is important that you check your bank accounts and credit reports regularly to identify illegal activity. Early detection is key to minimizing the damage that mistakes and fraudulent activity can have on your credit.

The federal FACTA law enables you to receive one free credit report per year from each of the three credit reporting agencies. These are in addition to the free reports you can order after you place a Fraud Alert on your credit file. Order your free credit reports online at www.annualcreditreport.com.

We recommend that you stagger the receipt of your credit reports, ordering one approximately every four months. Order your report from a different agency each time. That way you can review your credit report three times each year. If you see possible fraudulent activity on your credit report, file all of the appropriate reports on this web site.

 

You Might Also Like

Consumer Credit Freeze

Contact Tracking Sheet

How to use a Police Report to help recover from identity theft

How to use an identity theft Affidavit to help recover from identity theft

Click here to add Utilities service (gas, electricity, water, sewer, etc.) to the list of the frauds you want to report.
Utilities service (gas, electricity, water, sewer, etc.)
Open

Download PDFUtilities service (gas, electricity, water, sewer, etc.)

Steps to Take Immediately – Follow each step below to help recover from the damage caused by identity theft.

 Step 1: Organize Your Case

In order to help law enforcement investigate your case, and to help recover from the damage caused by an identity theft, you should:

  • Keep a detailed list of all phone calls you receive or make related to your identity theft incident including name of the person you spoke with, that person’s title, phone number, organization name, and what was said during the conversation.
  • Make sure you keep a copy of all financial statements, police reports, affidavits, credit reports, collection letters, and all other documents related to your incident.
  • Keep all loose documents in a notebook or accordion folder.
  • Send all correspondence using certified mail with return receipt requested.
  • Keep track of your time and any expenses you incur in the event you are given the opportunity to be reimbursed for your costs through court ordered restitution.

Use ID Theft Central’s Contact Tracking Sheet to keep track of the people you speak with regarding your identity theft incident.

Step 2: Contact the Utility company’s Fraud Department

Contact the utility company’s Fraud Department and tell them you are a victim of identity theft.

Rocky Mountain Power Fraud Department. 888-221-7070

Questar Credit and Collections Department 801-324-3903

Request a copy of the application and any other supporting documentation. According to the FACTA, consumers are entitled to a copy of the application and business transaction records no later than 30 days from receipt of request. You will need to provide proof of positive identification, a copy of the police report and an affidavit that is acceptable to the business entity. There should be no charge for this information.

Step 3: Initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert

To help protect your personal identifying information from being used to obtain new utility services by a thief, initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert. A 90 Day Fraud Alert notifies potential credit grantors to verify your identification before extending new credit in your name.

  • You only need to contact one of the three credit reporting companies to set up a Fraud Alert for all three.
  • You will receive a free copy of your credit report from all three credit reporting companies.
  • You will receive a notice of your rights as an identity theft victim.
  • A 90 Day Fraud Alert stays on your file for at least 90 days and can be renewed.
  • A Fraud Alert may slow down your approval process for new credit.

To place a Fraud Alert, you may be required to provide appropriate proof of your identity, which may include copies of your Social Security card, driver’s license, and/or utility bills. You may cancel the fraud alerts at any time.

Experian
P.O. Box 9532
Allen, TX 75013
1-888-397-3742
www.experian.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Equifax
P.O. Box 740250
Atlanta, GA 30374-0241
1-800-525-6285
www.equifax.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Transunion
P.O. Box 6790
Fullerton, CA 92834-6790
1-800-680-7289
www.transunion.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Step 4: File an identity theft report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department

Once you have confirmed unauthorized use of your information to set up a utility in your name, file a report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department.

  • Report the crime at ID Theft Central.
  • Contact your local police department and report the crime by calling their non-emergency number and explain to them what happened.
  • Make sure your police department issues you a police report with a case number.
  • You can use their police report to obtain a Consumer Credit Freeze from the credit reporting companies at no cost.  You can also use the report to help clear the damage caused by the theft.

Step 5:  Monitor your bank accounts and credit reports regularly

It is important that you check your bank accounts and credit reports regularly to identify illegal activity. Early detection is key to minimizing the damage that mistakes and fraudulent activity can have on your credit.

The federal FACTA law enables you to receive one free credit report per year from each of the three credit reporting agencies. These are in addition to the free reports you can order after you place a Fraud Alert on your credit file. Order your free credit reports online at www.annualcreditreport.com.

We recommend that you stagger the receipt of your credit reports, ordering one approximately every four months. Order your report from a different agency each time. That way you can review your credit report three times each year. If you see possible fraudulent activity on your credit report, file all of the appropriate reports on this web site.

 

You Might Also Like

Consumer Credit Freeze

Contact Tracking Sheet

How to use a Police Report to help recover from identity theft

How to use an identity theft Affidavit to help recover from identity theft

Judicial

Click here to add False civil judgment to the list of the frauds you want to report.
False civil judgment
Open

Download PDFFalse civil judgment 

Steps to Take Immediately – Follow each step below to help recover from the damage caused by identity theft.

 Step 1: Organize Your Case

In order to help law enforcement investigate your case, and to help recover from the damage caused by an identity theft, you should:

  • Keep a detailed list of all phone calls you receive or make related to your identity theft incident including name of the person you spoke with, that person’s title, phone number, organization name, and what was said during the conversation.
  • Make sure you keep a copy of all financial statements, police reports, affidavits, credit reports, collection letters, and all other documents related to your incident.
  • Keep all loose documents in a notebook or accordion folder.
  • Send all correspondence using certified mail with return receipt requested.
  • Keep track of your time and any expenses you incur in the event you are given the opportunity to be reimbursed for your costs through court ordered restitution.

Use ID Theft Central’s Contact Tracking Sheet to keep track of the people you speak with regarding your identity theft incident.

Step 2: Contact the Court

Contact the court that issued the order and report that you are a victim of identity theft. You may have to appear before a judge. Ask the court what documents are needed to prove your innocence. Be prepared to present proof of your identity and supporting documentation disputing the charges and/or warrant.

You may want to retain an attorney to assist you with this process. You can call the Utah Bar Association at (801)531-9077 to find an attorney, or visit www.utahbar.org

Step 3: Initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert

To help protect your personal identifying information from being used to obtain new credit by a thief, initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert. A 90 Day Fraud Alert notifies potential credit grantors to verify your identification before extending new credit in your name.

  • You only need to contact one of the three credit reporting companies to set up a Fraud Alert for all three.
  • You will receive a free copy of your credit report from all three credit reporting companies.
  • You will receive a notice of your rights as an identity theft victim.
  • A 90 Day Fraud Alert stays on your file for at least 90 days and can be renewed.
  • A Fraud Alert may slow down your approval process for new credit.

To place a Fraud Alert, you may be required to provide appropriate proof of your identity, which may include copies of your Social Security card, driver’s license, and/or utility bills. You may cancel the fraud alerts at any time.

Experian
P.O. Box 9532
Allen, TX 75013
1-888-397-3742
www.experian.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Equifax
P.O. Box 740250
Atlanta, GA 30374-0241
1-800-525-6285
www.equifax.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Transunion
P.O. Box 6790
Fullerton, CA 92834-6790
1-800-680-7289
www.transunion.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Step 4: File an identity theft report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department

Once you have confirmed there are false civil or criminal judgments in your name, file a report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department.

  • Report the crime at ID Theft Central.
  • Contact your local police department and report the crime by calling their non-emergency number and explain to them what happened.
  • Make sure your police department issues you a police report with a case number.
  • You can use their police report to obtain a Consumer Credit Freeze from the credit reporting companies at no cost.  You can also use the report to help clear the damage caused by the theft.

Step 5:  Monitor your bank accounts and credit reports regularly

It is important that you check your bank accounts and credit reports regularly to identify illegal activity. Early detection is key to minimizing the damage that mistakes and fraudulent activity can have on your credit.

The federal FACTA law enables you to receive one free credit report per year from each of the three credit reporting agencies. These are in addition to the free reports you can order after you place a Fraud Alert on your credit file. Order your free credit reports online at www.annualcreditreport.com.

We recommend that you stagger the receipt of your credit reports, ordering one approximately every four months. Order your report from a different agency each time. That way you can review your credit report three times each year. If you see possible fraudulent activity on your credit report, file all of the appropriate reports on this web site.

 

You Might Also Like

Consumer Credit Freeze

Contact Tracking Sheet

How to use a Police Report to help recover from identity theft

How to use an identity theft Affidavit to help recover from identity theft

 

Miscellaneous

Click here to add Email phishing/pharming to the list of the frauds you want to report.
Email phishing/pharming
Open

Download PDFEmail phising/pharming 

Phishing can be sophisticated or simple. In its simple forms it is not new or novel. It is as simple as the information cards you fill out at displays or information fairs. Take for example the win the free car booth you pass in the mall. In order to “win the car” you fill out a card that lists some of your personal information i.e. your name and address. This is a type of phishing and in this format is legal.

There are more complex forms of phishing that are the state of the art in crime. These are the fake web sites that pose as real web sites for banks and other financial institutions. These sites may be sent to you in an email or pop up on your computer screen when you are attempting to reach the real site. The site directs you to enter your personal information including account numbers. The information is then sent to an identity thief who uses the information to access your account before you know it.

Steps to Take Immediately – Follow each step below to help recovery from the damage caused by identity theft.

Step 1:Take these steps to minimize any damage if you suspect that you have responded to a phishing scam with personal or financial information or entered this information into a fake web site.

  • Change the passwords or PINs on all your online accounts that you think could be compromised.
  • If you know of any accounts that were accessed or opened fraudulently, close those accounts.
  • Routinely review your bank and credit card statements monthly for unexplained charges or inquiries that you did not initiate.
  • If your email was hacked, you should notify individuals in your Contacts list and inform them of the situation.  Warn them not to provide money or personal information to email requests originating from the compromised email account.

Step 2: Organize Your Case

In order to help law enforcement investigate your case, and to help recover from the damage caused by an identity theft, you should:

  • Keep a detailed list of all phone calls you receive or make related to your identity theft incident including name of the person you spoke with, that person’s title, phone number, organization name, and what was said during the conversation.
  • Make sure you keep a copy of all financial statements, police reports, affidavits, credit reports, collection letters, and all other documents related to your incident.
  • Keep all loose documents in a notebook or accordion folder.
  • Send all correspondence using certified mail with return receipt requested.
  • Keep track of your time and any expenses you incur in the event you are given the opportunity to be reimbursed for your costs through court ordered restitution.

Use ID Theft Central’s Contact Tracking Sheet to keep track of the people you speak with regarding your identity theft incident.

Step 3: Initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert

Once you have confirmed the information provided in an email or phishing scam is being used to obtain new credit by a thief, initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert. A 90 Day Fraud Alert notifies potential credit grantors to verify your identification before extending new credit in your name.

  • You only need to contact one of the three credit reporting companies to set up a Fraud Alert for all three.
  • You will receive a free copy of your credit report from all three credit reporting companies.
  • You will receive a notice of your rights as an identity theft victim.
  • A 90 Day Fraud Alert stays on your file for at least 90 days and can be renewed.
  • A Fraud Alert may slow down your approval process for new credit.

To place a Fraud Alert, you may be required to provide appropriate proof of your identity, which may include copies of your Social Security card, driver’s license, and/or utility bills. You may cancel the fraud alerts at any time.

Experian
P.O. Box 9532
Allen, TX 75013
1-888-397-3742
www.experian.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Equifax
P.O. Box 740250
Atlanta, GA 30374-0241
1-800-525-6285
www.equifax.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Transunion
P.O. Box 6790
Fullerton, CA 92834-6790
1-800-680-7289
www.transunion.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Step 4: File an identity theft report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department

Once you have confirmed the information you provided went to a thief, who then opened new credit accounts, or withdrew money from your financial institution, file a report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department.

  • Report the crime at ID Theft Central.
  • Contact your local police department and report the crime by calling their non-emergency number and explain to them what happened.
  • Make sure your police department issues you a police report with a case number.
  • You can use their police report to obtain a Consumer Credit Freeze from the credit reporting companies at no cost.  You can also use the report to help clear the damage caused by the theft.

Step 5:  Monitor your bank accounts and credit reports regularly

It is important that you check your bank accounts and credit reports regularly to identify illegal activity. Early detection is key to minimizing the damage that mistakes and fraudulent activity can have on your credit.

The federal FACTA law enables you to receive one free credit report per year from each of the three credit reporting agencies. These are in addition to the free reports you can order after you place a Fraud Alert on your credit file. Order your free credit reports online at www.annualcreditreport.com.

We recommend that you stagger the receipt of your credit reports, ordering one approximately every four months. Order your report from a different agency each time. That way you can review your credit report three times each year. If you see possible fraudulent activity on your credit report, file all of the appropriate reports on this web site.

 

You Might Also Like

Consumer Credit Freeze

Contact Tracking Sheet

How to use a Police Report to help recover from identity theft

How to use an identity theft Affidavit to help recover from identity theft

 

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If none of the identity theft types in the list pertain to your situation, then select this form.  You will need to answer a few questions about yourself, and you should describe your incident and what happened in your own words.  You should also do the following:

Step 1: Organize Your Case

In order to help law enforcement investigate your case, and to help recover from the damage caused by an identity theft, you should:

  • Keep a detailed list of all phone calls you receive or make related to your identity theft incident including name of the person you spoke with, that person’s title, phone number, organization name, and what was said during the conversation.
  • Make sure you keep a copy of all financial statements, police reports, affidavits, credit reports, collection letters, and all other documents related to your incident.
  • Keep all loose documents in a notebook or accordion folder.
  • Send all correspondence using certified mail with return receipt requested.
  • Keep track of your time and any expenses you incur in the event you are given the opportunity to be reimbursed for your costs through court ordered restitution.

Use ID Theft Central’s Contact Tracking Sheet to keep track of the people you speak with regarding your identity theft incident.

Step 2: Initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert

To help protect your personal identifying information from being used to obtain new credit by a thief, initiate a 90 Day Fraud Alert. A 90 Day Fraud Alert notifies potential credit grantors to verify your identification before extending new credit in your name.

  • You only need to contact one of the three credit reporting companies to set up a Fraud Alert for all three.
  • You will receive a free copy of your credit report from all three credit reporting companies.
  • You will receive a notice of your rights as an identity theft victim.
  • A 90 Day Fraud Alert stays on your file for at least 90 days and can be renewed.
  • A Fraud Alert may slow down your approval process for new credit.

To place a Fraud Alert, you may be required to provide appropriate proof of your identity, which may include copies of your Social Security card, driver’s license, and/or utility bills. You may cancel the fraud alerts at any time.

Experian
P.O. Box 9532
Allen, TX 75013
1-888-397-3742
www.experian.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Equifax
P.O. Box 740250
Atlanta, GA 30374-0241
1-800-525-6285
www.equifax.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Transunion
P.O. Box 6790
Fullerton, CA 92834-6790
1-800-680-7289
www.transunion.com

Click to file an initial 90-Day Fraud Alert

Step 3: File an identity theft report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department

Once you have confirmed unauthorized use of your personal information, you should file a report at ID Theft Central or with your local police department.

  • Report the crime at ID Theft Central.
  • Contact your local police department and report the crime by calling their non-emergency number and explain to them what happened.
  • Make sure your police department issues you a police report with a case number.
  • You can use their police report to obtain a Consumer Credit Freeze from the credit reporting companies at no cost.  You can also use the report to help clear the damage caused by the theft.

Step 4:  Monitor your bank accounts and credit reports regularly

It is important that you check your bank accounts and credit reports regularly to identify illegal activity. Early detection is key to minimizing the damage that mistakes and fraudulent activity can have on your credit.

The federal FACTA law enables you to receive one free credit report per year from each of the three credit reporting agencies. These are in addition to the free reports you can order after you place a Fraud Alert on your credit file. Order your free credit reports online at www.annualcreditreport.com.

We recommend that you stagger the receipt of your credit reports, ordering one approximately every four months. Order your report from a different agency each time. That way you can review your credit report three times each year. If you see possible fraudulent activity on your credit report, file all of the appropriate reports on this web site.

 

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Consumer Credit Freeze

Contact Tracking Sheet

How to use a Police Report to help recover from identity theft

How to use an identity theft Affidavit to help recover from identity theft

 

 

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